Nutshell

My life in a Nutshell

7 notes &

5 miles
It was slow and hard and then I looked back and realized that I haven’t run this distance since June 19.  I’m considering an early October half marathon so I figured I should probably be getting ready for some long runs.

5 miles

It was slow and hard and then I looked back and realized that I haven’t run this distance since June 19.  I’m considering an early October half marathon so I figured I should probably be getting ready for some long runs.

3 notes &

Why yes, I do in fact love summer eating and those grilled veggies made it on my plate for both lunch and dinner.  
Mixed Greens, cucumbers, celery, grilled zucchini, parmesan cheese, balsamic with some shrimp on the side and piece of seeded multigrain toast topped with sliced tomato. 
Dinner done right.

Why yes, I do in fact love summer eating and those grilled veggies made it on my plate for both lunch and dinner. 

Mixed Greens, cucumbers, celery, grilled zucchini, parmesan cheese, balsamic with some shrimp on the side and piece of seeded multigrain toast topped with sliced tomato. 

Dinner done right.

2 notes &

Back to the regularly scheduled programing over here…

Yesterday, I got my ass up at 4:30am to go practice with my tri group.  The actual getting out of bed part sucked.  My body was still somewhat on mountain time, but I set my alarm 15 minutes earlier than I usually do on Friday mornings to give myself a little extra waking up time.  I totally kicked ass yesterday (for me).  I was 3rd out of the water out of probably 10-12 people swimming and I was 4th to last (and the other slow woman in the group wasn’t even there yesterday) on the bike which may not sound great, but I was either last or 2nd to last the entire season last year.  I averaged 14.2 miles per hour for the 10 hilly miles.  That is my best bike yet.  Not of the season.  Ever.  I’ve never seen a 14.0 mph average.  I think my previous highest was 13.8.  We get to choose our run distance when we get off the bike.  It’s anywhere from 1-3 miles.  I ran 1.5 and it was slow and tough, but I did it.  I don’t know if it was coming back to sea level or a week break from swimming, biking, and mostly running (I ran 7 miles over the course of my time away) while still staying active in other ways, but my body felt strong. 

In other news, when I went to pick up my farm share on Thursday, the sign read amongst many other things “Basil- as much as you want.  Pull the whole plant).  I pulled 4 basil plants and brought them home.  I’ve been throwing them in my salads and such, but with that much basil, I knew I had to make something.  So, today out of my kitchen came a regular basil pesto which I froze in ice cube trays for later cooking use and an artichoke basil pesto which is pretty delightful.  If you are interested in either, you can find the recipe after the break.

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Filed under recipe pesto artichoke

9 notes &

I promise I will shortly stop hijacking your newsfeed with my Utah pictures. Shortly, as in at the end of this post. I just absolutely LOVE the incredible scenery and opportunities that are present in Utah and want to share it with all of you.

We left Bryce early to make it to Kanab for the lottery.  Only one person from each party is allowed to enter the lottery.  Each application gets assigned a number.   Then, they literally use a Bingo spinner thing with numbered balls to select who gets in.  We got so lucky that there were many small groups on our day.  5 permits were issued (2 parties of 1, 2 2s, and 1 4).  The people who weren’t chosen were asked to leave.  We had to sit through an orientation led by a ranger who scared the crap out of us talking about all of the dangers of hiking in the desert in summer.  All of which I knew, but having someone repeatedly tell you that this is the desert, in summer, and you could die isn’t a lighthearted conversation. 

We followed that up with a visit to Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park.  This is a visit I’m glad we did, but like Cedar Breaks, I don’t need to go back.  I enjoyed it and it’s certainly pretty, but for me once was enough.  We then tackled the challenge of trying to rent a 4WD vehicle to get to the trailhead for The Wave.  You see, it was Sunday in Utah and every single rental place we tried was closed.  We ended up driving 75 miles to Page, Arizona to get a Jeep because we were not about to pass up an opportunity of a lifetime because we couldn’t rent a car.  We started early to beat the heat.  We were on trail around 6:45am (we had to wait for some rain to pass delaying our original start time of 6am).  This is unmarked territory.  We were actually asked by the Bureau of Land Management to kick down any cairns we saw because they get people lost.  Since there is not a trail, the cairns are just there randomly where people chose to build them.  They don’t lead you to or from anywhere.  It took us about two hours each way (6.4 miles round trip).  Two glorious hours.  It wasn’t yet too hot.  Hiking with only coordinates and landmarks requires more mental energy which I really enjoyed.  It was my first hike of this sort. It was recommended that we turn around and take photos one our way out so we could use them to help us find our way back.  Apparently most people who get lost, do so on the way back.  I can’t put into words how surreal and amazing The Wave was.  It holds beauty within unlike any other.  This will forever be a special memory.  Upon returning to the trailhead we decided to continue for about a mile and a half in the opposite direction from our car.  That led us to Buckskin Gulch, the longest slot canyon in the country.  We only had time to go in a little bit (bottom two pictures), but it was well worth the few extra miles.  This day ranks up there for me as one of the very best days.

Sidenote: Dehydration in the desert is no joke.  I drank 140 oz of water (some with nuun) while we were out on the trail.  I drank a Gatorade when returned to the car, another 32 oz of water while driving to Zion, and 2 huge cups at dinner that night.  I still woke up in the middle of the night totally parched with a screaming headache and a very nauseous stomach.  And, we were off the trail and in the air conditioned car by the time it hit 90 degrees. As the saying goes, hydrate or die.

Utah, you did me right.  Until next time….

6 notes &


After leaving the Boulder Mountain Lodge, we continued down Route 12 into Bryce.  As I said earlier, this is seriously one of the most amazing drives in the country. We stopped a couple of times to stretch our legs (or hips if you are me….all the sitting from the plane and car were getting to me). We arrived in time to check in, gather food from the “feed bag” that we kept in the back of the car and head into the park with two other friends who were there for an evening walk on the rim and a picnic atop the canyon.  You can dress me up and take me out to fancy restaurants and I’ll be happy, but I feel most at home eating outside in the company of friends.  This was perfect. I’ve been to Bryce a lot.  Bryce at night was a first and it was great. We ran a 5k the following morning and it was wonderful, but in all honesty that was the least exciting thing that I did all week.  It was well organized, beautiful, and fun.  After the race, Greg and I decided to take a leisurely ride into Panguitch….just for old times sake.  We used to camp in Hatch, just down the road, when we lead trips and always ran into Panguitch for one thing or another.  While we were there we saw down the block a sign for Cedar Breaks.  Neither of us had ever been there and we decided if it was 30 miles away or less we had time to work it in.  We pulled up to the sign and it read 29 miles.  So, we drove to Cedar Breaks.  It was lovely, but not someplace I need to visit again.  That evening, we returned to Bryce and had dinner with our friends.  That was the night of the full moon hike.  As we approached the canyon, the sky looked ominous. We hung out on the rim desperately waiting for the moon to make it’s appearance and we only got to see if for a few brief seconds.  We sat there for about an hour contemplating what to do when it started pouring on us.  With thunder and lightening on the horizon we made the smart decision and retreated for the evening.  The night hike never happened.  Instead with went to bed so we could rise early to hit The Wave lottery in Kanab at 8:30 which you already know was a huge success.  More on that tomorrow. 

10 notes &

Now that I’m home and have my photos from my camera on my computer I thought I’d share in a little more detail.  I’m calling the day I arrived Day -1 since I got in at 11:45 at night.  It was a travel day and doesn’t count. 

Day 1: We woke up a bit earlier than expected (thanks body for that EST wake up) and since Brenna kindly shares her adventures, I had seen some great pictures recently. We decided to hit up Dog Lake and Lake Mary before we left SLC.  We would have liked to hike further on to the other lakes, but we had a 4 hour drive to Capitol Reef and then another hour+ onto Boulder, UT for the night.  Coming from sea level, the breathing was hard, but the scenery was stunning.  I loved this little excursion because the rest of our hikes in Southern Utah looked so drastically different.  That’s one of the things I love about UT.  The terrain is more varied than any other state I’ve been to and the possibilities for adventuring are endless.  Every time I go back, I find more I want to do and explore. 

Our drive down to Capitol Reef was pretty uneventful.  However, when we arrived it started pouring.  We decided to stay in the car for a bit and and do the 20 mile scenic drive and then see what the weather had in store for us.  By the time we had finished it had stopped raining.  One of the rangers had told us that one of the best places to hike, given the inclement weather  was to Hickman’s Bridge.  The map says it’s one mile each way, but I’d say it’s a little more than that since we had been hiking for awhile when we reached a sign that said .7 miles to Hickman’s Bridge.  The great thing about hiking after a storm (and a flash flood) is that almost everyone else had left the park.  We got to the natural bridge, played around for about 30 minutes and took some pictures without seeing another soul.  We didn’t bump into anyone until we were about half way back to the parking lot. 

We continued on to Boulder that night, grabbing a delicious Mexican dinner enroute.  Driving Highway 12 is something everyone should do at least once in their lifetime.  Driving highway 12 at night is not.  There were black cows everywhere.  We almost hit several of them and later learned that if you hit a cow in Utah, you owe the farmer for the cost of the cow.  I’m glad we didn’t do that.  That night was the one night we splurged and stayed at the Boulder Mountain Lodge.  This place is amazing and also something everyone should get the chance to do, but if that’s not in your game plan and you are on Highway 12, at the very least stop at their restaurant Hell’s Backbone for a meal.  We had breakfast there.  It was out of this world.  I hear dinner is the same. 

13 notes &

Well hello there new followers.

I’m guessing that runningwithguts' post led you here the other day.  Welcome.  Here you'll find an account of mostly my athletic endeavors, my exploration in the kitchen, and my adventures.  Some times during the year they are more frequent than others (teacher in summer).  A few fun facts about me:

  • I grew up on Long Island, though from an early age I knew that wasn’t the place for me.  I value the time I spent there and appreciate the fact that if I can make my way around NYC, I can probably hold my own in most other cities. I’ve been living in Vermont since I was 18 and adore this place, the culture, the recreational opportunities, the music scene, and the local food movement.
  • I’ve visited 40 of our 50 states.  I still need to get to: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee.  Anyone up for a trip?
  • I started running almost 3 years ago.  It wasn’t something I ever planned on doing and then I committed to running half of a marathon for a friend who had been critically injured.  She’s back to running nearly 3 years later and I’m still at it.  I’ll probably always be a back of the packer and sometimes I still have trouble identifying myself as a runner, but I’m sticking with it.
  • I’m a first and second grade teacher.  Even though I have none of my own (and am not sure I want them), I adore kids.  I think they often have amazing insight that is over looked by so many adults.  The box that they think within is so much more expansive than ours as adults.  They teach me as much as I teach them.  And, even though I love my job, I also love summer.
  • When I had just gotten my license my sister was in 8th grade.  She wanted to drive the car.  I wanted to be the cool big sister and let her, but I was also nervous she’d crash it.  So I told her to sit on my lap so I could get the brakes if I needed them.  We laughed so hard that she peed all over me.  True story.

Feel free to ask questions, leave comments, or just follow along on this little journey of mine. 

7 notes &

And I’ll do The Narrows with you! I’m thinking next summer might need to include Rocky Mountain National Park too. I’ve never been there. Road trip? Katiegirl, adventure partner in crime to be, will you be joining?

PS I want more info about your new shoes:-). What are they and how do you like them?

And I’ll do The Narrows with you! I’m thinking next summer might need to include Rocky Mountain National Park too. I’ve never been there. Road trip? Katiegirl, adventure partner in crime to be, will you be joining?

PS I want more info about your new shoes:-). What are they and how do you like them?